Sesderma MELASES TRX Gel Depigmenting – Review

Tranexamic acid (TXA) is rising in the Western beauty arena. More and more brands create formulations with TXA like SkinCeuticals and Murad. However, two Spanish brands have offered products with TXA for years in the West – Sesderma and Mesoestetic. Today the focus will be on one of Sesderma’s serums. 

The formula is rich; a lot is going on. First of all, there’s tranexamic acid, but its concentration is unknown, and Sesderma don’t want to share the information. The other brightening ingredients are azelaic acid, 4-n-butylresorcinol (supposedly more effective than hydroquinone and kojic acid), niacinamide, and an extract of Withania somnifera — quite a bunch. We can also find retinyl palmitate among the squad; I’m not sure how effective it is, given that there isn’t much of it.  

The formula includes growth factors of which I am not a fan, as they can help to grow healthy and unhealthy cell tissues in the skin. The product is fragrance-free, but there’s a lot of alcohol, the third ingredient in the list. The hyaluronic acid and glycerine can’t cope with the amount, as the product is quite drying. Like many from the brand, this preparation also has its active ingredients enclosed in liposomes, tiny fat bubbles, allowing the actives to penetrate deeper into skin.

I bought the product with the intention to reduce the redness left by a botched IPL treatment, discussed in my review of the Bioderma Matricium, as all of my 2020 was revolving around trying to eliminate it. Tranexamic acid is a no-brainer, known for decreasing hyperpigmentation and redness, even caused by IPL treatments. Outside beauty formulations, TXA is used to control bleeding. As my redness seems more like dialled blood vessels than usual erythema, I’d thought that TXA would be helpful. The product has a consistency of a lightweight gel, and it absorbs quickly. It fades marks and hyperpigmentation, left by various sorts of spots, astonishingly well. The process takes a few days to vanish them completely. As for the aforementioned facial reddening, it seems like the preparation has improved it to some degree. On different zones of my face, I can see patches of my natural skin tone. I am not sure if the skin’s self-repairing mechanism or the TXA gel has done that, but I will attribute the breakthrough to this product. I don’t have any chronic hyperpigmentation issues besides the unusual redness. Still, I believe that this serum would help to treat some skin conditions such as melasma, though not as the only remedy but a supplement to a complex routine. Treatment of any skin condition requires more than one approach.

Nevertheless, I feel uneasy about recommending this concoction due to the inclusion of the growth factors. I bought the product last year, and at that time, the ingredients list was nowhere to be found online. I ordered it from an online pharmacy without even considering that it could contain growth factors. All I cared about was getting something with tranexamic acid. Growth factors are a polarising topic among beauty experts, and there are no conclusive studies that would prove or disprove their contribution to the growth of skin tumours. But there’s always a chance. I don’t want to come across as hypocritical; I preach against growth factors, but at the same time, I use serums with them. No, I don’t knowingly buy preparations with growth factors, and I’ve only finished half the bottle because I don’t feel comfortable using the product. The growth factors are uncharted waters, and it’s the reason why you won’t see them in formulas of the big brands.

Another thing that I didn’t appreciate when using the product was its drying effect. It made my skin constantly dehydrated. I had to use thick layers of moisturisers and even facial oils to prevent flaking. If you have dry or sensitive skin, avoid this gel.  

The MELASES TRX Gel Depigmenting is an effective brightening product; it does what it says on the box. It works well for hyperpigmentation, and it can possibly help with chronic skin pigmentation issues. However, it doesn’t get my seal of approval because of the addition of growth factors and the gel causing terribly dehydrated skin. 

Ingredients: WATER, LECITHIN, ALCOHOL, TRANEXAMIC ACID, PROPANEDIOL, POLYSORBATE 20, WITHANIA SOMNIFERA ROOT EXTRACT, TETRAHYDRODIFERULOYLMETHANE, SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE, SODIUM HYALURONATE, SODIUM ASCORBATE, QUERCETIN, NICOTIANA BENTHAMIANA SH-POLYPEPTIDE-7, NIACIN, GLUTATHIONE, AZELAIC ACID, 4-BUTYLRESOLCINOL, NICOTIANA BENTHAMIANA HEXAPEPTIDE-40 SH-POLYPEPTIDE 6, PINUS PINASTER BARK EXTRACT, EPIGALLOCATECHIN, GALLATE, PEG-40HUDROGENATED CASTOR OIL, CARBOMER, TRIETHANOLAMIDE, TOCOPHERYL ACETATE, SODIUM CHOLATE, SODIUM CHLORIDE, DISODIUM EDTA, BHT, SODIUM HYDROXIDE, DIGLYCERIN, BUTYLENE GLICOL, RETINYL PALMITATE, TROMETHAMINE, GLYCERIN, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, SODIUM BISULFITE, PENTYLENE GLYCOL, DIPOTASSIUM PHOSPHATE, PHENOXYETANOL, ETHYLHEXYLGLYCERIN. (skinelement.shop)

While you’re here, I want to ask all of you a favour. I am petitioning for a ban on sunbeds in the EU; the Petitions Committee approved my petition last Friday, and it’s now available to supporters. I would love it if you could support my petition on the EU’s petitions website – here. Unfortunately, you have to register on the EU’s petitions website – I know it’s a dealbreaker for many people, so it’s ok if you don’t want to. Also, you don’t have to be an EU citizen/resident to register. If you have any questions regarding my petition or the registration process, please do not hesitate to ask; you can contact me via email, Instagram, and Weibo. I really appreciate any help you can provide. 

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